Talk To Frank resources-for-family

About Talk To Frank

Talk To Frank is an anti-drugs campaign in the United Kingdom that has been running for the longest time. Has it managed to get people to quit substance abuse?

Drug education in the UK was changed forever ten years ago when a Swat team raided a quiet suburban kitchen. The doom and gloom teachings coupled with pushing to keep away from the drug pushers who are everywhere was thrown out. In came strange humour and a light, yet energetic approach.


The first advert presented an adolescent inviting the police to come and arrest his mum because the mum wanted them to talk about drugs. The message, "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So Talk to Frank", was brand new as well.


Frank Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Devised by the advertising agency, Mother, Frank was actually the National Drugs Helpline brand new name. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. Frank is has become a household name among the young people due to the many adventure stories that came from the theme such as Pablo the drugs mule dog to a tour of the brain warehouse.


According to the creative director, Justin Tindall, of the advertising agency, Leo Burnett, it was important that Frank was at no time seen in the flesh so that he could never be the victim of ridicule for wearing the incorrect shoes or attempting to be "down with the kids". Even the sham Frank videos on YouTube are moderately deferential. There is additionally no sign that Frank is a specialist of the services, something that makes it uncommon in the annals of government-supported movements.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


Most promotions in Europe now concentrate, similar to Frank, on attempting to give fair-minded data to help youngsters settle on their own choices. There are still images of prison cells and hurt parents being presented in countries that have strong penalties for drugs possession. For example, in Singapore, a recent campaign recently told young people, "You play, you pay."

In the UK, the government has burned through millions on Above the Influence, a long-running movement that urges positive contrasting options to drug usage utilizing a blend of amusement and useful examples. The stress is on chatting to youngsters by using their language - one advertisement depicts a group of "stoners" forsaken on a couch. But the scare tactics is still prevalent in majority of the campaigns against drugs around the globe, especially the "descent into hell" which is drug inspired. A good example is a Canadian commercial that appeared recently and formed part of the DrugsNot4Me series in which a beautiful, self-assured young woman changes into a trembling, hollow-eyed skeleton because of "drugs".

Ads that reveal the dangers of drug abuse mostly push frustrated people into experimenting with drugs, according to a data from the anti-drugs campaign of the UK from 1999 to 2004.


Frank made brand new ground - and received a lot of criticism from the conservative opposition politicians at that time - for being brave enough to put forward that substances might provide highs and lows.


An early online advertisement told people that cocaine made you feel on of the world.

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. Matt Powell was the creative director of digital agency Profero, the company that came up with the cocaine ad; he now thinks he miscalculated the time an average user spends on browsing the internet. It is difficult for some to view the ad till the last point where the dangers of drug use were listed. However, Powell claims the objective was to be more open with youngsters regarding substances, in an attempt to form the credibility of the Frank image.

According to the Home Office, 67% of younger people in a survey stated that they would ask Frank if they required advice on drugs. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. These figures provide proof that the Frank approach bears results.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

During the decade that the Frank campaign was introduced, drug abuse figures in the UK have reduced by 9%; however, much of the decline has been attributed to a reduction in the use of cannabis as the more youth shun smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national service that offers drug education and was formed in 2003 by the Department of Health in partnership with Home Office of the British government. FRANK's vision is to equip the youth with the bold facts and knowledge about the legal and illegal use of narcotics to reduce the drug use. A lot of media campaigns have been put out on both the radio and the internet.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Services

FRANK provides the following services for people who seek information and/or advice about drugs

  • A dedicated website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat service, available from 2pm-6pm daily
  • A service to locate counselling and treatment